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ExecuJet Australia prepares for entry into service of Falcon 6X
ExecuJet has been sending maintenance engineers for type-rating and technical training on the 6X. Other technicians have been trained on the PW812D engines that power the aircraft.
ExecuJet is readyng to provide line maintenance for Dassault's Falcon 6X across Australia and New Zealand.

ExecuJet MRO Services Australia (ExecuJet) is preparing for the Falcon 6X by investing in tooling and training, so as to be ready to provide line maintenance for Dassault's new flagship flying into Australia and New Zealand.

ExecuJet has been sending maintenance engineers from Australia to Dassault in France and the US for type-rating and technical training on the aircraft. Other technicians have been trained by Pratt & Whitney Canada's approved training organisation in the US on the PW812D engines that power the aircraft. The Falcon 6X was certified by EASA and the FAA on 22 August. Entry into service is now imminent.

“Our investment in training and tooling for the 6X strengthens our position as a 'centre of excellence' for Dassault Aviation civil aircraft in Australasia,” says Grant Ingall, regional VP Australasia at ExecuJet MRO Services. “The tooling we are investing in includes the specific ones for the Falcon 6X airframe and PW812D engines. We have also applied for certification from the relevant civil aviation regulators, such as the US FAA, to be approved to do line maintenance on this new aircraft type.”

Even though there will be no Falcon 6X aircraft based in Australia initially, ExecuJet personnel have to be equipped and trained; ready to provide line maintenance for these aircraft visiting Australia and the Pacific region.

Jason Jia, a licensed aircraft maintenance engineer at ExecuJet, recently travelled from Australia to Dallas Fort Worth, Texas where he completed an engine maintenance training course at FlightSafety International, for the P&WC PW812D that powers the aircraft.

He says: “Training overseas at the DFW South Learning Center in the US has been an enriching experience. The facility has a PW800 engine so we had the opportunity to be hands on with our training. We also did training using virtual reality. There was a software programme called the Virtual Engine Trainer where you could take apart all the major engine components. You can also observe what the engine looks like from the inside to get a better understanding of the engine's internal structure; something you normally have no chance to see.”

All engine parts and systems were covered in the training: integrated blade rotor, fan and boosts, high pressure compressor (HPC), combustor, turbines, exhaust, the air system, fuel and control system, electrical system and the full authority digital engine control (FADEC).

Jia continues: “Our instructor, Doris, is an experienced and knowledgeable aviation technician who has worked for the military for many years. Her instructions were pretty detailed and very helpful for our understanding of this engine."

ExecuJet MRO Services Australia has over 80 personnel and plans to add more engineers and technicians, including some already certified to work on Dassault aircraft.

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